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Sunday, 07 August 2011 02:15

Fluorocarbons: Physical & Chemical Hazards

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Chemical Name
CAS-Number

Physical

Chemical

UN Class or Division /  Subsidiary Risks

BENZOTRIFLUORIDE
98-08-8

3

BROMOTRIFLUOROMETHANE
75-63-8

The vapour is heavier than air and may accumulate in low ceiling spaces causing deficiency of oxygen

The substance decomposes on heating producing hydrogen bromide, hydrogen fluoride • The substance is a strong reducing agent and reacts with oxidants • Reacts with strong oxidants, aluminium

2.2

CHLORODIFLUOROBROMOMETHANE
353-59-3

The gas is heavier than air and may accumulate in low ceiling spaces causing deficiency of oxygen

The substance decomposes on contact with open flames or very hot surfaces, producing toxic gases

2.2

1,1,1-CHLORODIFLUOROETHANE
75-68-3

2.1

CHLORODIFLUOROMETHANE
75-45-6

The gas is heavier than air and may accumulate in low ceiling spaces causing deficiency of oxygen

On contact with hot surfaces or flames this substance decomposes forming corrosive and very toxic fumes (hydrogen chloride, phosgene, chlorine, hydrogen fluoride) • Reacts violently with powdered metals such as aluminium and zinc, causing fire and explosion hazard • Attacks magnesium and its alloys

2.2

CHLOROPENTAFLUOROETHANE
76-15-3

The vapour is heavier than air and may accumulate in low ceiling spaces causing deficiency of oxygen

The substance decomposes on heating producing hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride • Reacts with strong oxidants

2.2

CHLOROTRIFLUOROMETHANE
75-72-9

On contact with hot surfaces or flames this substance decomposes forming HCl, HF, Carbonyl halides • The substance decomposes in a fire or on contact with certain metals producing toxic products

2.2

DICHLORODIFLUOROMETHANE
75-71-8

The gas is heavier than air and may accumulate in low ceiling spaces causing deficiency of oxygen

On contact with hot surfaces or flames this substance decomposes forming corrosive and very toxic fumes (hydrogen chloride, phosgene, chlorine, hydrogen fluoride) • Reacts violently with metals such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, zinc and powdered aluminium • Attacks magnesium and its alloys

2.2

DICHLOROFLUOROMETHANE
75-43-4

The gas is heavier than air

The substance decomposes on heating producing corrosive and highly toxic fumes (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, and phosgene) • Reacts violently with chemically active metals • Reacts with acids or acid fumes producing highly toxic fumes (chlorine, fluorine) • Attacks some forms of plastics, rubber and coatings

2.2

DICHLOROTETRAFLUOROETHANE
1320-37-2

2.2

DIFLUORODIBROMOMETHANE
75-61-6

9

1,1-DIFLUOROETHANE
75-37-6

2.1

ENFLURANE
13838-16-9

The substance decomposes on heating or on burning producing toxic and corrosive fumes (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, phosgene)

HEXAFLUOROACETONE
684-16-2

2.3/ 8

1,1,2,2-TETRACHLORO-1,2-DIFLUO­ROETHANE        76-12-0

2.2

1,1,1,2-TETRACHLORO-2,2-DIFLUO­ROETHANE
76-11-9

2.2

TETRAFLUOROMETHANE
75-73-0

The gas is heavier than air and may accumulate in low ceiling spaces causing deficiency of oxygen

On contact with hot surfaces or flames this substance decomposes forming hydrofluoric acid

2.2

1,1,2-TRICHLORO-1,2,2-TRIFLUORO­ETHANE
76-13-1

The vapour is heavier than air and may accumulate in low ceiling spaces causing deficiency of oxygen

On contact with hot surfaces or flames this substance decomposes forming corrosive and very toxic fumes (carbonylfluoride, hydrogen chloride, phosgene, chlorine, hydrogen fluoride) • Reacts violently with calcium, potassium, sodium and powdered metals such as aluminium, beryllium, magnesium and zinc, causing fire and explosion hazard • Attacks alloys containing more than 2% magnesium

TRICHLOROFLUOROMETHANE
75-69-4

The gas is heavier than air • The vapour is heavier than air and may accumulate in low ceiling spaces causing deficiency of oxygen

On contact with hot surfaces or flames this substance decomposes forming corrosive and very toxic fumes (hydrogen chloride, phosgene, chlorine, hydrogen fluoride) • Reacts violently with metals and various powdered metals, such as aluminium, barium, calcium, magnesium and sodium

TRIFLUOROMETHANE
75-46-7

2.2

VINYL FLUORIDE
75-02-5

2.1

VINYLIDENE FLUORIDE
75-38-7

The gas is heavier than air and may travel along the ground; distant ignition possible, and may accumulate in low ceiling spaces causing deficiency of oxygen • As a result of flow, agitation, etc, electrostatic charges can be generated

The substance can form explosive peroxides • The substance can polymerize with fire or explosion hazard • Heating may cause violent combustion or explosion • The substance decomposes on burning producing hydrogen fluoride • Reacts violently with oxidants and hydrogen chloride

For UN Class: 1.5 = very insensitive substances which have a mass explosion hazard; 2.1 = flammable gas; 2.3 = toxic gas; 3 = flammable liquid; 4.1 = flammable solid; 4.2 = substance liable to spontaneous combustion; 4.3 = substance which in contact with water emits flammable gases; 5.1 = oxidizing substance; 6.1 = toxic; 7 = radioactive; 8 = corrosive substance

 

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Contents

Preface
Part I. The Body
Part II. Health Care
Part III. Management & Policy
Part IV. Tools and Approaches
Part V. Psychosocial and Organizational Factors
Part VI. General Hazards
Part VII. The Environment
Part VIII. Accidents and Safety Management
Part IX. Chemicals
Part X. Industries Based on Biological Resources
Part XI. Industries Based on Natural Resources
Part XII. Chemical Industries
Part XIII. Manufacturing Industries
Part XIV. Textile and Apparel Industries
Part XV. Transport Industries
Part XVI. Construction
Part XVII. Services and Trade
Part XVIII. Guides