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Work systems encompass such macro level organizational variables as the personnel subsystem, the technological subsystem and the external environment. The analysis of work systems is, therefore, essentially an effort to understand the allocation of functions between the worker and the technical outfit and the division of labour between people in a sociotechnical environment. Such an analysis can assist in making informed decisions to enhance systems safety, efficiency in work, technological development and the mental and physical well-being of workers.

Researchers examine work systems according to divergent approaches (mechanistic, biological, perceptual/motor, motivational) with corresponding individual and organizational outcomes (Campion and Thayer 1985). The selection of methods in work systems analysis is dictated by the specific approaches taken and the particular objective in view, the organizational context, the job and human characteristics, and the technological complexity of the system under study (Drury 1987). Checklists and questionnaires are the common means of assembling databases for organizational planners in prioritizing action plans in areas of personnel selection and placement, performance appraisal, safety and health management, worker-machine design and work design or redesign. Inventory methods of checklists, for example the Position Analysis Questionnaire, or PAQ (McCormick 1979), the Job Components Inventory (Banks and Miller 1984), the Job Diagnostic Survey (Hackman and Oldham 1975), and the Multi-method Job Design Questionnaire (Campion 1988) are the more popular instruments, and are directed to a variety of objectives.

The PAQ has six major divisions, comprising 189 behavioural items required for the assessment of job performance and seven supplementary items related to monetary compensation:

  • information input (where and how does one get information on the jobs to perform) (35 items)
  • mental process (information processing and decision-making in performing the job) (14 items)
  • work output (physical work done, tools and devices used) (50 items)
  • interpersonal relationships (36 items)
  • work situation and job context (physical/social contexts) (18 items)
  • other job characteristics (work schedules, job demands) (36 items).

 

The Job Components Inventory Mark II contains seven sections. The introductory section deals with the details of the organization, job descriptions and biographical details of the job holder. Other sections are as follows:

  • tools and equipment—uses of over 200 tools and equipment (26 items)
  • physical and perceptual requirements—strength, coordination, selective attention (23 items)
  • mathematical requirements—uses of numbers, trigonometry, practical applications, e.g., work with plans and drawings (127 items)
  • communication requirements—the preparation of letters, use of coding systems, interviewing people (19 items)
  • decision-making and responsibility—decisions about methods, order of work, standards and related issues (10 items)
  • job conditions and perceived job characteristics.

 

The profile methods have common elements, that is, (1) a comprehensive set of job factors used to select the range of work, (2) a rating scale that permits the evaluation of job demands, and (3) the weighing of job characteristics based on organizational structure and sociotechnical requirements. Les profils des postes, another task profile instrument, developed in the Renault Organization (RNUR 1976), contains a table of entries of variables representing working conditions, and provides respondents with a five-point scale on which they can select the value of a variable that ranges from very satisfactory to very poor by way of registering standardized responses. The variables cover (1) the design of the workstation, (2) the physical environment, (3) the physical load factors, (4) nervous tension, (5) job autonomy, (6) relations, (7) repetitiveness and (8) contents of work.

The AET (Ergonomic Job Analysis) (Rohmert and Landau 1985), was developed based on the stress-strain concept. Each of the 216 items of the AET are coded: one code defines the stressors, indicating whether a work element does or does not qualify as a stressor; other codes define the degree of stress associated with a job; and yet others describe the duration and frequency of stress during the work shift.

The AET consists of three parts:

  • Part A. The Man-at-Work system (143 items) includes the work objects, tools and equipment, and work environment constituting the physical, organizational, social and economic conditions of work.
  • Part B. The Task analysis (31 items) classified according to both the different kinds of work object, such as material and abstract objects, and worker-related tasks.
  • Part C. The Work Demand analysis (42 items) comprises the elements of perception, decision and response/activity. (The AET supplement, H-AET, covers body postures and movements in industrial assembling activities).

 

Broadly speaking, the checklists adopt one of two approaches, (1) the job-oriented approach (e.g., the AET, Les profils des postes) and (2) the worker-oriented approach (e.g., the PAQ). The task inventories and profiles offer subtle comparison of complex tasks and occupational profiling of jobs and determine the aspects of work which are considered a priori as inevitable factors in improving working conditions. The emphasis of the PAQ is on classifying job families or clusters (Fleishman and Quaintence 1984; Mossholder and Arvey 1984; Carter and Biersner 1987), inferring job component validity and job stress (Jeanneret 1980; Shaw and Riskind 1983). From the medical point of view, both the AET and the profile methods allow comparisons of constraints and aptitudes when required (Wagner 1985). The Nordic questionnaire is an illustrative presentation of ergonomic workplace analysis (Ahonen, Launis and Kuorinka 1989), which covers the following aspects:

  • work space
  • general physical activity
  • lifting activity
  • work postures and movements
  • accident risk
  • job content
  • job restrictiveness
  • worker’s communication and personal contacts
  • decision-making
  • repetitiveness of the work
  • attentiveness
  • lighting conditions
  • thermal environment
  • noise.

 

Among the shortcomings of the general-purpose checklist format employed in ergonomic job analysis are the following:

  • With some exceptions (e.g., the AET, and the Nordic questionnaire), there is a general lack of ergonomics norms and protocols of evaluation with respect to the different aspects of work and environment.
  • There are dissimilarities in the overall construction of the checklists as regards means of determining the characteristics of working conditions, the quotation form, criteria and methods of testing.
  • The evaluation of physical workload, work postures and work methods is limited on account of lack of precision in the analysis of work operations, with reference to the scale of relative levels of stress.
  • The principal criteria of assessment of the worker’s mental load are the degree of complexity of the task, the attention required by the task and the execution of mental skills. The existing checklists refer less to underuse of abstract thought mechanisms than to overuse of concrete thought mechanisms.
  • In most checklists, methods of analysis attach major importance to the job as a position as opposed to the analysis of work, worker-machine compatibility, and so forth. The psycho-sociological determinants, which are fundamentally subjective and contingent, are less emphasized in the ergonomics checklists.

 

A systematically constructed checklist obliges us to investigate the factors of work conditions which are visible or easy to modify, and permits us to engage in a social dialogue between employers, job holders and others concerned. One should exercise a degree of caution towards the illusion of simplicity and efficiency of the checklists, and towards their quantifying and technical approaches as well. Versatility in a checklist or questionnaire can be achieved by including specific modules to suit specific objectives. Therefore, the choice of variables is very much linked to the purpose for which the work systems are to be analysed and this determines the general approach for construction of a user-friendly checklist.

The suggested “Ergonomics Checklist” may be adopted for various applications. Data collection and computerized processing of the checklist data are relatively straightforward, by responding to the primary and secondary statements (q.v.).

 


ERGONOMICS CHECKLIST

A broad guideline for a modular-structured work systems checklist is suggested here, covering five major aspects (mechanistic, biological, perceptual/motor, technical and psychosocial). Weighting of the modules varies with the nature of the job(s) to be analysed, the specific features of the country or population under study, organizational priorities and the intended use of the results of the analysis. Respondents mark the “primary statement” as Yes/No. “Yes” answers indicate the apparent absence of a problem, although the advisability of further careful scrutiny should not be ruled out. “No” answers indicate a need for an ergonomics evaluation and improvement. Responses to “secondary statements” are indicated by a single digit on the severity of agreement/disagreement scale illustrated below.

0            Do not know or not applicable

1            Strongly disagree

2            Disagree

3            Neither agree nor disagree

4            Agree

5            Strongly agree

A. Organization, worker and the task    Your answers/ratings

The checklist designer may provide a sample drawing/photograph of work and
workplace under study.

1. Description of organization and functions.

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

2. Worker characteristics: A brief account of the work group.

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

3. Task description: List activities and materials in use. Give some indication of 
the work hazards.

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

B. Mechanistic aspect    Your answers/ratings

I. Job Specialization

4.Tasks/work patterns are simple and uncomplicated.             Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

4.1 Job assignment is specific to the operative.        

4.2 Tools and methods of work are specialized to the purpose of the job.  

4.3 Production volume and quality of work.  

4.4 Job holder performs multiple tasks.   

II. Skill Requirement

5. Job requires simple motor act.             Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

5.1 Job requires knowledge and skilful ability.    

5.2 Job demands training for skill acquisition.     

5.3 Worker makes frequent mistakes at work.    

5.4 Job demands frequent rotation, as directed.   

5.5 Work operation is machine paced/assisted by automation.   

Remarks and suggestions for improvement. Items 4 to 5.5:

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

q Analyst’s rating       Worker’s rating q

C. Biological aspect    Your answers/ratings

III. General Physical Activity

6. Physical activity is entirely determined and
regulated by the worker.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

6.1 Worker maintains target-oriented pace.   

6.2 Job implies frequently repeated movements.   

6.3 Cardiorespiratory demand of the job:   

sedentary/light/moderate/heavy/ extremely heavy. 

(What are the heavy work elements?):

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

(Enter 0-5)

6.4 Job demands high muscular strength exertion.   

6.5 Job (operation of handle, steering wheel, pedal brake) is predominantly static work.   

6.6. Job requires fixed working position (sitting or standing).   

 

IV.  Manual Materials Handling (MMH)

Nature of objects handled: animate/inanimate, size and shape.

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

7. Job requires minimal MMH activity.            Yes/No

If No, specify the work:

7.1 Mode of work:        (circle one)

pull/push/turn/lift/lower/carry

(Specify repetition cycle):

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________


7.2 Load weight (kg):        (circle one)

5-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-40, >>40.

7.3 Subject-load horizontal distance (cm):       (circle one)

<25, 25-40, 40-55, 55-70, >70.

7.4 Subject-load height:       (circle one)

ground, knee, waist, chest, shoulder level.

(Enter 0-5)

7.5 Clothing restricts MMH tasks.   

8. Task situation is free from risk of bodily injury.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)        

8.1 Task can be modified to reduce the load to be handled.   

8.2 Materials can be packed in standard sizes.   

8.3 Size/position of handles on objects may be improved.   

8.4 Workers do not adopt safer methods of load handling.   

8.5 Mechanical aids may reduce bodily strains.
List each item if hoists or other handling aids are available.   

Suggestions for improvement, Items 6 to 8.5:

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

V. Workplace/Workspace Design

Workplace may be diagrammatically illustrated, showing human reach and
clearance:

9. Workplace is compatible with human dimensions.              Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

9.1 Work distance is away from normal reach in the horizontal or vertical plane (>60 cm).   

9.2 Height of work desk/equipment is fixed or minimally adjustable.   

9.3 No space for subsidiary operations (e.g., inspection and maintenance).   

9.4 Workstations have obstacles, protruding parts or sharp edges.   

9.5 Work surface floors are slippery, uneven, cluttered or unstable.   

10. Seating arrangement is adequate  (e.g., comfortable chair,
good postural support).            Yes/No

If No, the causes are:            (Enter 0-5)

10.1 Seat dimensions (e.g., seat height, back rest) mismatch with human dimensions.   

10.2 Minimum adjustability of seat.   

10.3 Workseat provides no hold/support (e.g., by means of vertical edges/extra stiff covering) to work with the machinery.   

10.4 Absence of vibration damping mechanism in the workseat.   

11. Sufficient auxiliary support is available for safety
at the workplace.            Yes/No

If No, mention the following:            (Enter 0-5)

11.1 Non-availability of storage space for tools, personal articles.   

11.2 Doorways, entrance/exit routes, or corridors are restricted.  

11.3 Design mismatch of handles, ladders, staircases, handrails.   

11.4 Handholds and footholds demand awkward position of limbs.   

11.5 Supports are unrecognizable by their place, form or construction.   

11.6 Limited use of gloves/footwear to work and operate equipment controls.   

Suggestions for improvement, Items 9 to 11.6:

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

VI. Work Posture

12. Job allows a relaxed work posture.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:             (Enter 0-5)

12.1 Working with arms above shoulder and/or away from the body.   

12.2 Hyperextension of wrist and demand of high strength.   

12.3 Neck/shoulder are not maintained at an angle of about 15°.   

12.4 Back bent and twisted.   

12.5 Hips and legs are not well supported in seated position.   

12.6 One-sided and unsymmetrical movement of the body.   

12.7 Mention reasons of forced posture:
(1) machine location
(2) seat design,
(3) equipment handling,
(4) workplace/workspace

12.8 Specify OWAS code. (For a detailed description of the OWAS
method refer to Karhu et al. 1981.)

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

Suggestions for improvement, Items 12 to 12.7:

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

VII. Work Environment

(Give measurements where possible)

NOISE

[Identify noise sources, type and duration of exposure; refer to ILO 1984 code].

13. Noise level is below the maximum              Yes/No
sound level recommended. (Use the following table.)

Rating

Work requiring no verbal communication

Work requiring verbal communication

Work requiring concentration

1

under 60 dBA

under 50 dBA

under 45 dBA

2

60-70 dBA

50-60 dBA

45-55 dBA

3

70-80 dBA

60-70 dBA

55-65 dBA

4

80-90 dBA

70-80 dBA

65-75 dBA

5

over 90 dBA

over 80 dBA

over 75 dBA

Source: Ahonen et al. 1989.

Give your agreement/disagreement score (0-5)  

14. Damaging noises are suppressed at the source.             Yes/No

If No, rate countermeasures:            (Enter 0-5)

14.1 No effective sound isolation present.   

14.2 Noise emergency measures are not taken (e.g., restriction of working time, use of personal ear defenders/protectors).   

15. CLIMATE

Specify climatic condition.

Temperature  ____

Humidity ____

Radiant Temperature ____

Draughts ____

16. Climate is comfortable.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

16.1 Temperature sensation (circle one):

cool/slightly cool/neutral/warm/very hot

16.2 Ventilation devices (e.g., fans, windows, air conditioners) are not adequate.   

16.3 Non-execution of regulatory measures on exposure limits (if available, please elaborate).   

16.4 Workers do not wear heat protective/assistive clothing.   

16.5 Drinking fountains of cool water are not available nearby.   

17. LIGHTING

Workplace/machine(s) are sufficiently illuminated at all times.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

17.1 Illumination is sufficiently intense.   

17.2 Illumination of work area is adequately uniform.   

17.3 Flicker phenomena are minimal or absent.   

17.4 Shadow formation is nonproblematical.   

17.5 Annoying reflected glares are minimal or absent.   

17.6 Colour dynamics (visual accentuation, colour warmth) are adequate.   

18. DUST, SMOKE, TOXICANTS

Environment is free from excessive dust, 
fumes and toxic substances.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

18.1 Ineffective ventilation and exhaust systems to carry off fumes, smoke and dirt.   

18.2 Lack of protection measures against emergency release and contact with dangerous/toxic substances.   

List the chemical toxicants:

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

18.3 Monitoring of the workplace for chemical toxicants is not regular.   

18.4 Non-availability of personal protective measures (e.g., gloves, shoes, mask, apron).   

19. RADIATION

Workers are effectively protected against radiation exposure.            Yes/No

If No, mention the exposures 
(see ISSA checklist, Ergonomics):            (Enter 0-5)

19.1 UV radiation (200 nm – 400 nm).   

19.2 IR radiation (780 nm – 100 μm).   

19.3 Radioactivity/x-ray radiation (<200 nm).   

19.4 Microwaves (1 mm – 1 m).   

19.5 Lasers (300 nm – 1.4 μm).   

19.6 Others (mention):

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________


20. VIBRATION

Machine can be operated without vibration transmission
to the operator’s body.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

20.1 Vibration is transmitted to the whole body via the feet.   

20.2 Vibration transmission occurs through the seat (e.g., mobile machines that are driven with operator seated).   

20.3 Vibration is transmitted through the hand-arm system (e.g., power-driven handtools, machines driven when operator is walking).   

20.4 Prolonged exposure to continuous/repetitive source of vibration.   

20.5 Vibration sources cannot be isolated or eliminated.   

20.6 Identify the sources of vibration.

Comments and suggestions, items 13 to 20:

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

VIII. Work Time Schedule

Indicate work time: work hours/day/week/year, including seasonal work and shift system.

21. Pressure of work time is minimum.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

21.1 Job requires night work.   

21.2 Job involves overtime/extra work time.   

Specify average duration:

_______________________________________________________________

21.3 Heavy tasks are unevenly distributed throughout the shift.   

21.4 People work at a predetermined pace/time limit.   

21.5 Fatigue allowances/work-rest patterns are not sufficiently incorporated (use cardio- respiratory criteria on work severity).   

Comments and suggestions, items 21 to 21.5:

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

 

   Analyst’s rating       Worker’s ratin   

 

D. Perceptual/motor aspect    Your answers/ratings

IX. Displays

22. Visual displays (gauges, meters, warning signals) 
are easy to read.            Yes/No

If No, rate the difficulties:            (Enter 0-5)

22.1 Insufficient lighting (refer to item No. 17).   

22.2 Awkward head/eye positioning for visual line.   

22.3 Display style of numerals/numerical progression creates confusion and causes reading errors.   

22.4 Digital displays are not available for accurate reading.   

22.5 Large visual distance for reading precision.   

22.6 Displayed information is not easily understood.   

23. Emergency signals/impulses are easily recognizable.            Yes/No

If No, assess the reasons:

23.1 Signals (visual/auditory) do not conform to the work process.   

23.2 Flashing signals are out of visual field.   

23.3 Auditory display signals are not audible.   

24. Groupings of the display features are logical.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:

24.1 Displays are not distinguished by form, position, colour or tone.   

24.2 Frequently used and critical displays are removed from the central line of vision.   

X. Controls

25. Controls (e.g., switches, knobs, cranes, driving wheels, pedals) are easy to handle.            Yes/No

If No, the causes are:            (Enter 0-5)

25.1 Hand/foot control positions are awkward.   

25.2 Handedness of the controls/tools is incorrect.   

25.3 Dimensions of controls do not match the operating body part.   

25.4 Controls require high actuating force.   

25.5 Controls require high precision and speed.   

25.6 Controls are not shape-coded for good grip.   

25.7 Controls are not colour/symbol-coded for identification.   

25.8 Controls cause unpleasant feeling (warmth, cold, vibration).   

26. Displays and controls (combined) are compatible with easy and comfortable human reactions.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

26.1 Placements are not sufficiently close to each other.   

26.2 Display/controls are not sequentially arranged for functions/frequency of use.   

26.3 Display/control operations are successive, without enough time span to complete operation (this creates sensory overloading).   

26.4 Disharmony in movement direction of display/control (e.g., leftward control movement does not give leftward unit movement).   

Comments and suggestions, items 22 to 26.4:

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

 

   Analyst’s rating       Worker’s rating   

E. Technical aspect    Your answers/ratings

XI. Machinery

27. Machine (e.g., conveyer trolley, lifting truck, machine tool) 
is easy to drive and work with.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

27.1 Machine is unstable in operation.   

27.2 Poor maintenance of the machinery.   

27.3 Driving speed of the machine cannot be regulated.   

27.4 Steering wheels/handles are operated, from standing position.   

27.5 Operating mechanisms hamper body movements in the workspace.   

27.6 Risk of injury due to lack of machine guarding.   

27.7 Machinery is not equipped with warning signals.   

27.8 Machine is poorly equipped for vibration damping.   

27.9 Machine noise levels are above legal limits (refer to items No. 13 and 14)   

27.10 Poor visibility of machine parts and adjacent area (refer to items No. 17 and 22).   

XII. Small Tools/Implements

28. Tools/implements provided to the operatives are 
comfortable to work with.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

28.1 Tool/implement has no carrying strap/back frame.   

28.2 Tool cannot be used with alternate hands.   

28.3 Heavy weight of the tool causes hyperextension of the wrist.   

28.4 Form and position of the handle are not designed for convenient grip.   

28.5 Power-driven tool is not designed for two-hand operation.   

28.6 Sharp edges/ridges of the tool/equipment can cause injury.      

28.7 Harnesses (gloves, etc.) are not regularly used in operating vibrating tool.   

28.8 Noise levels of power-driven tool are above acceptable limits 
(refer to item No. 13).   

Suggestions for improvement, items 27 to 28.8:

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

XIII. Work Safety

29. Machine safety measures are adequate to prevent 
accidents and health hazards.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

29.1 Machine accessories cannot be fastened and removed easily.   

29.2 Dangerous points, moving parts and electrical installations are not adequately guarded.   

29.3 Direct/indirect contact of body parts with machinery can cause hazards.   

29.4 Difficulty in inspection and maintenance of the machine.   

29.5 No clear instructions available for machine operation, maintenance and safety.   

Suggestions for improvement, items 29 to 29. 5:

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

 

   Analyst’s rating       Worker’s rating   

F. Psychosocial aspect    Your answers/ratings

XIV. Job Autonomy

30. Job allows autonomy (e.g., freedom regarding method of work, 
performance conditions, time schedule, quality control).            Yes/No

If No, the possible causes are:            (Enter 0-5)

30.1 No discretion on the starting/finishing times of the job.   

30.2 No organizational support as regards calling for assistance at work.   

30.3 Insufficient number of people for the task (teamwork).   

30.4 Rigidity in work methods and conditions.   

XV. Job Feedback (Intrinsic and Extrinsic)

31. Job allows direct feedback of information as to the quality 
and quantity of one’s performance.            Yes/No

If No, the reasons are:            (Enter 0-5)

31.1 No participative role in task information and decision making.   

31.2 Constraints of social contact due to physical barriers.   

31.3 Communication difficulty due to high noise level.   

31.4 Increased attentional demand in machine pacing.   

31.5 Other people (managers, co-workers) inform the worker as to his/her effectiveness of job performance.   

XVI. Task Variety/Clarity

32. Job has a variety of tasks and calls for spontaneity on the part of the worker.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

32.1 Job roles and goals are ambiguous.   

32.2 Job restrictiveness is imposed by a machine, process or work group.   

32.3 Worker-machine relation arouses conflict as to behaviour to be evinced by operator.   

32.4 Restricted level of stimulation (e.g., unchanging visual and auditory environment).   

32.5 High level of boredom on the job.   

32.6 Limited scope for job enlargement.   

XVII. Task Identity/Significance

33. Worker is given a batch of tasks             Yes/No
and arranges his or her own schedule to complete the work
(e.g., one plans and executes the job and inspects and
manages the products).

Give your agreement/disagreement score (0-5)   

34. Job is significant in the organization.            Yes/No
It provides acknowledgement and recognition from others.

(Give your agreement/disagreement score)

XVIII. Mental Overload/Underload

35. Job consists of tasks for which clear communication and 
unambiguous information support systems are available.            Yes/No

If No, rate the following:            (Enter 0-5)

35.1 Information supplied in connection with the job is extensive.   

35.2 Information handling under pressure is required (e.g., emergency manoeuvering in process control).   

35.3 High information-handling workload (e.g., difficult positioning task—no special motivation required).   

35.4 Occasional attention is directed to information other than that needed for the actual task.   

35.5 Task consists of repetitive simple motor act, with superficial attention needed.   

35.6 Tools/equipment are not pre-positioned to avoid mental delay.   

35.7 Multiple choices are required in decision making and judging risks.   

(Comments and suggestions, items 30 to 35.7)

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

XIX. Training and Promotion

36. Job has opportunities for associated growth in competence 
and task accomplishment.            Yes/No

If No, the possible causes are:            (Enter 0-5)

36.1 No opportunity for advancement to higher levels.   

36.2 No periodic training for operators, specific to jobs.   

36.3 Training programs/tools are not easy to learn and use.   

36.4 No incentive pay schemes.   

XX. Organizational Commitment

37. Defined commitment towards organizational            Yes/No
effectiveness, and physical, mental and social well-being.

Assess the degree to which the following are made available:            (Enter 0-5)

37.1 Organizational role in individual role conflicts and ambiguities.   

37.2 Medical/administrative services for preventive intervention in the case of work hazards.   

37.3 Promotional measures to control absenteeism in work group.   

37.4 Effective safety regulations.   

37.5 Labour inspection and monitoring of better work practices.   

37.6 Follow-up action for accident/injury management.   

 


 

 

 

The Summary Evaluation Sheet may be used for profiling and clustering of a selected group of items, which may form the basis for decisions on work systems. The process of analysis is often time-consuming and the users of these instruments must have a sound training in ergonomics both theoretical and practical, in the evaluation of work systems.

 


 

SUMMARY EVALUATION SHEET

A. Brief Description of Organization, Worker Characteristics and Task Description

...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................

     

Severity Agreement

   

Modules

Sections

No. of
rated
Items



0



1



2



3



4



5

Relative
Severity
(%)

Item No(s).
for Immediate
Intervention

B. Mechanistic

I. Job Specialization

II. Skill Requirement

4

5

               

C. Biological

III. General Physical Activity

IV. Manual Materials Handling

V. workplace/Workplace Design

VI. Work Posture

VII. Work Environment

VIII. Work Time Schedule

5

6

15

6

28

5

               

D. Perceptual/motor

IX. Displays

X. Controls

12

10

               

E. Technical

XI. Machinery

XII. Small Tools/Implements

XIII. Work Safety

10

8

5

               

F. Psychosocial

XIV. Job Autonomy

XV. Job Feedback

XVI. Task Variety/Clarity

XVII. Task Identity/Significance

XVIII. Mental Overload/Underload

XIX. Training and Promotion

XX. Organizational Commitment

5

5

6

2

7

4

6

               

Overall Assessment

Severity Agreement of the Modules

Remarks

A

 

B

 

C

 

D

 

E

 

F

 
 

Work Analyst:

 

 

 

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Read 4583 times Last modified on Thursday, 13 October 2011 20:28