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Chemical Name

CAS-Number

Colour/Form

Boiling Point (°C)

Melting Point  (°C)

Molecular Weight

Solubility in Water

Relative Density (water=1)

Relative Vapour Density (air=1)

Vapour Pressure/ (Kpa)

Inflam.
Limits

Flash Point (°C)

Auto Ignition Point (°C)

DIALLYL PHTHALATE
131-17-9

nearly colourless oily liquid

160-163

-70

246.26

@ 25 °C

1.120

8.3

@ 150 °C

166

DIBUTYL PHTHALATE
84-74-2

colourless to faint yellow viscous liquid; oily liquid

340

-35

278.34

insol

1.0459

9.58

<0.01

0.5 ll
25.0 ul

157 cc

402

DICYCLOHEXYL­PHTHALATE
84-61-7

white, granular solid

@ 4 mm Hg

66

330.4

insol

1.383

@ 150 °C

207

DIETHYL PHTHALATE
84-66-2

colourless, oily liquid

295

-40.5

222.3

insol

1.1175

7.7

@ 75 °C

0.7

161 oc

457

DIISODECYL PHTHALATE
26761-40-0

@ 4 mm Hg

-50

446.7

insol

0.966

@ 200 °C

0.3 ll
? ul

232 oc

402

DIISOOCTYL PHTHALATE
27554-26-3

nearly colourless, viscous liquid

370

-4

390.54

insol

0.986

13.5

<10 Pa

227

393

DIMETHYL PHTALATE
131-11-3

oily-liquid; colourless viscous liquid; pale yellow crystals

283.7

5.5

194.2

insol

1.1905

6.69

<0.01 mm Hg

0.9 ll
? ul

132

490

DIMETHYL TEREPHTHALATE
120-61-6

colourless crystals; needles from ether

288

140

194.2

sl sol

@ 25 °C

5.5

@ 150 °C

0.8 ll
11.8 ul

146 oc

500

DI-sec-OCTYL PHTALATE
117-81-7

light coloured liquid; colourless oily liquid

384

-50

390.54

@ 25 °C

0.9861

16.0

0.001

0.3 ll
? ul

215 oc

390

PHTHALIC ACID, DIHEPTYL ESTER
3648-21-3

colourless liquid

360

362.45

0.01%

PHTHALIC ACID, DIISOBUTYL ESTER
84-69-5

liquid

296.5

-64

278.33

insol

@ 15 °C

185 oc

432

 

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Friday, 12 August 2011 00:50

Phthalates: Physical & Chemical Hazards

Chemical Name
CAS-Number

Physical

Chemical

UN Class or Division /  Subsidiary Risks

DIALLYL PHTHALATE
131-17-9

The substance will polymerize if not inhibited, due to heating or in the presence of a catalyst • On combustion, forms toxic carbon oxides • Reacts with strong oxidants, bases and acids

DIBUTYL PHTHALATE
84-74-2

As a result of flow, agitation, etc, electrostatic charges can be generated

The substance decomposes on burning producing toxic and irritating fumes (phthalic anhydride)

DICYCLOHEXYL PHTHALATE
84-61-7

Reacts with acids, bases

DIETHYL PHTHALATE
84-66-2

The substance decomposes on heating or on burning producing toxic fumes and gases (phthalic anhydride) • Attacks some plastics

DIISODECYL PHTHALATE
26761-40-0

Attacks some forms of plastics

DIISOOCTYL PHTHALATE
27554-26-3

Reacts with strong oxidants

DI-sec-OCTYL PHTALATE
117-81-7

Reacts with strong oxidants, acids, alkalis, and nitrates

For UN Class: 1.5 = very insensitive substances which have a mass explosion hazard; 2.1 = flammable gas; 2.3 = toxic gas; 3 = flammable liquid; 4.1 = flammable solid; 4.2 = substance liable to spontaneous combustion; 4.3 = substance which in contact with water emits flammable gases; 5.1 = oxidizing substance; 6.1 = toxic; 7 = radioactive; 8 = corrosive substance

 

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Friday, 12 August 2011 00:48

Phthalates: Health Hazards

Chemical Name

CAS-Number

ICSC Short-Term Exposure

ICSC Long-Term Exposure

ICSC Routes of Exposure and Symptoms

US NIOSH Target Organs Routes of Entry

US NIOSH Symptoms

DIALLYL PHTHALATE     131-17-9

eyes; skin; lungs

liver

Ingestion: diarrhoea, laboured breathing

DIBUTYL PHTHALATE      84-74-2

Eyes; resp sys; GI tractInh; ing; con

Irrit eyes, upper resp sys, stomach

DICYCLOHEXYL PHTHALATE     84-61-7

eyes; skin; resp. tract

DIETHYL PHTHALATE      84-66-2

eyes; skin; CNS

Inhalation: dizziness, dullness

Skin: redness

Eyes: redness, pain

Eyes; skin; resp sys; CNS; PNS; repro sysInh; inh; con

Irrit eyes, skin, nose, throat; head, dizz, nau; lac; possible polyneur, vestibular dysfunc; pain, numb, weak, spasms in arms & legs; in animals: repro effects

DIISODECYL PHTHALATE     26761-40-0

eyes; skin

liver

Skin: redness

Eyes: redness

Ingestion: dizziness, nausea, vomiting

DIMETHYL PHTHALATE     131-11-3

eyes; nose; throat

birth defects

Eyes; resp sys; GI tractInh; ing; con

Irrit eyes, upper resp sys; stomach pain

DIMETHYL TEREPHTHALATE     120-61-6

eyes

DI-sec-OCTYL PHTHALATE     117-81-7

eyes; skin; resp. tract; lungs; GI tract

skin

Inhalation: cough, sore throat

eyes; GI tract; resp sys; CNS; liver; repro sys (in animals: liver tumors)Inh; ing; con

Irrit eyes, muc memb; in animals: liver damage; terato effects; (carc)

 

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Friday, 12 August 2011 00:46

Phthalates: Chemical Identification

Chemical Formula

Chemical

Synonyms
UN Code

CAS-Number

131179

DIALLYL PHTHALATE

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-2-propenyl ester ;
Phthalic acid, diallyl ester;
o-Phthalic acid, diallyl ester

131-17-9

84742

DIBUTYL PHTHALATE

o-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dibutyl ester;
Benzene-o-dicarboxylic acid di-n-butyl ester;
DBP;
Dibutyl 1,2-benzenedicarboxylate;
Dibutyl phthalate;
Di-n-butyl phthalate;
n-Butylphthalate;
Polycizer dbp

84-74-2

84617

DICYCLOHEXYL PHTHALATE

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dicyclohexyl ester;
Phthalic acid, dicyclohexyl ester

84-61-7

84662

DIETHYL PHTHALATE

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diethyl ester;
Ethyl phthalate;
Neantine;
Palatinol a;
Phthalol

84-66-2

3648213

DIHEPTYL PHTHALATE

Di-n-heptyl phthalate;
Heptyl phthalate

3648-21-3

26761400

DIISODECYL PHTHALATE

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis(isodecyl)phthalate;
DIDP (plasticizer);
Diisodecyl phthalate;
Phthalic acid, diisodecyl ester

26761-40-0

131113

DIMETHYL PHTHALATE

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dimethyl ester;
Dimethyl-1,2-benzenedicarboxylate;
DMP;
Methyl phthalate;
Phthalic acid methyl ester

131-11-3

117817

DI-sec-OCTYL PHTHALATE

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis(2-ethylhexyl) ester;
Bis(2-ethylhexyl)-1,2-benzenedicar­boxylate;
Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate;
Di(2-ethylhexyl)orthophthalate

117-81-7

84695

PHTHALIC ACID, DIISOBUTYL ESTER

DIBP;
Diisobutyl phthalate;
Hexaplas M;
1B;
Palatinol IC

84-69-5

27554263

PHTHALIC ACID, DIISOOCTYL ESTER

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diisooctyl ester;
Diisooctyl phthalate;
Isooctyl phthalate;
Phthalic acid, bis(6-methylheptyl)ester

27554-26-3

27253265

PHTHALIC ACID, DIISOTRIDECYL ESTER

1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diisotri­decyl ester;
Diisotridecyl phthalate

27253-26-5

636099

TEREPHTHALIC ACID, DIETHYL ESTER

1,4-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, diethyl ester;
Diethyl terephthalate

636-09-9

120616

TEREPHTHALIC ACID, DIMETHYL ESTER

1,4-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dimethyl 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate;
Dimethyl p-phthalate;
Dimethyl terephthalate;
DMT;
Methyl 4-carbomethoxybenzoate;
Terephthalic acid methyl ester

120-61-6

 

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Chemical Name
CAS-Number

Colour/Form

Boiling Point (°C)

Melting Point (°C)

Molecular Weight

Solubility in Water

Relative Density (water=1)

Relative Vapour Density (air=1)

Vapour Pressure/ (Kpa)

Inflam.
Limits

Flash Point (°C)

Auto Ignition Point (°C)

CALCIUM SILICATE
1344-95-2

white powder

insol

2.9

ETHYL SILICATE
78-10-4

colourless liquid

168.8

-82.5

208.30

insol

0.933

7.22

1.0 mm Hg

1.3 ll
23 ul

52 oc

METHYL DICHLOROSILANE
75-54-7

colourless liquid

41

-93

115.04

sl sol

@ 27 °C

3.97

46

6.0 ll
55 ul

-9 cc

316

METHYL SILICATE
681-84-5

colourless liquid

121-122

-2

152.25

reacts

1.032

5.3

2.2

METHYL TRICHLOROSILANE
75-79-6

colourless liquid

66.4

-90

149.48

reacts

@ 25 °C

5.17

17.9

5.1 ll
? ul

8

404

POLYDIMETHYLSIL­OXANE
9016-00-6

clear fluids available in wide range of viscosities

insol

0.97

>200

SILANE, DICHLORO-
4109-96-0

compressed, liquified gas

8.2

-122.0

101.01

1.22

3.484

4.1 ll
99 ul

-307

100 58

SILICIC ACID, DISODIUM SALT
6834-92-0

colourless monoclinic crystals; usually obtained as a glass; also orthorhombic crystals; dustless white granules

1089

122.07

sol

2.614

SILICON CARBIDE
409-21-2

exceedingly hard, green to bluish-black, iridescent, sharp crystals; hexagonal or cubic

2600

40.07

insol

3.23

SILICON MONOXIDE
10477-28-6

amorphous black solid

2.15-2.18

SILICON TETRAHYDRIDE
7803-62-5

gas; colourless

-112

-185

32.13

slowly decomposes

@ 19 °C

1.114

1.37

-22

SILICON TETRA­FLUORIDE
7783-61-1

colourless gas

-86

-90.2

104.06

@ -80 °C (liquid)

3.57

SILICON
7440-21-3

black to gray, lustrous, needle-like crystals or octahedral platelets (cubic system); amorphous form is dark brown powder

2355

1410

28.0855

insol

@ 25 °C/4 °C

SODIUM SILICATE
1344-09-8

colourless to white or grayish-white, crystal-like pieces or lumps; lumps of greenish glass; white powders; liquids cloudy or clear

sl sol

TETRACHLOROSILANE
10026-04-7

colourless, clear, mobile liquid

59

-70

169.89

@ 0 °C/4 °C

5.9

@ 5.4 °C

TRICHLOROSILANE
10025-78-2

colourless liquid

31.8

-126.5

135.47

1.3417

4.7

@ -16.4 °C

1.2 ll
90.5 ul

-14 oc

93-104

TRIMETHYLCHLOR­OSILANE
75-77-4

colourless liquid

57

-57.7

108.66

reacts

@ 25 °C

3.75

26.7

1.8 ll
6 ul

-27

 

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Chemical Name
CAS-Number

Physical

Chemical

UN Class or Division /  Subsidiary Risks

ETHYL SILICATE
78-10-4

3

METHYL DICHLOROSILANE
75-54-7

4.3/ 3/ 8

METHYL TRICHLOROSILANE
75-79-6

The vapour is heavier than air and may travel along the ground; distant ignition possible

The substance decomposes on heating producing hydrogen chloride • Reacts violently with strong oxidants • Reacts violently with water and moisture producing hydrogen chloride, causing fire and explosion hazard • Attacks metals like aluminium and magnesium

3/ 8

POLYDIMETHYLSILOXANE
9016-00-6

The substance decomposes on heating (>150 ºC) producing formaldehyde in small amounts

SILANE, DICHLORO-
4109-96-0

The gas is heavier than air

Reacts violently with water • On contact with air it emits hydrogen chloride

SILICIC ACID, DISODIUM SALT
6834-92-0

The substance is a strong base, it reacts violently with acid and is corrosive in moist air to metals like zinc, aluminium, tin and lead forming a flammable/explosive gas (hydrogen)

SILICON TETRAHYDRIDE
7803-62-5

The gas is heavier than air

The substance may spontaneously ignite on contact with air room temperature

SILICON TETRAFLUORIDE
7783-61-1

The gas is heavier than air

Reacts violently with water • On contact with air it emits hydrogen fluoride

2.3/ 8

SILICON
7440-21-3

4.1

TETRACHLOROSILANE
10026-04-7

The vapour is heavier than air

Reacts violently with water • On contact with air it emits hydrogen chloride and silicic acid

TRICHLOROSILANE
10025-78-2

The vapour is heavier than air and may travel along the ground; distant ignition possible

Reacts violently with water • On contact with air it emits hydrogen chloride • Attacks many metals in presence of water

4.3/ 3/ 8

TRIMETHYLCHLOROSILANE
75-77-4

The vapour is heavier than air and may travel along the ground; distant ignition possible

The substance decomposes on heating producing toxic and corrosive fumes (hydrogen chloride, phosgene) • Reacts violently with water, ketones, alcohol, amines and many other substances, causing explosion hazard • On contact with air it emits corrosive fumes of hydrogen chloride

3/ 8

For UN Class: 1.5 = very insensitive substances which have a mass explosion hazard; 2.1 = flammable gas; 2.3 = toxic gas; 3 = flammable liquid; 4.1 = flammable solid; 4.2 = substance liable to spontaneous combustion; 4.3 = substance which in contact with water emits flammable gases; 5.1 = oxidizing substance; 6.1 = toxic; 7 = radioactive; 8 = corrosive substance

 

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Chemical Name    

CAS-Number

ICSC Short-Term Exposure

ICSC Long-Term Exposure

ICSC Routes of Exposure and Symptoms

US NIOSH Target Organs & Routes of Entry

US NIOSH Symptoms

ETHYL SILICATE            78-10-4

Resp sys; liver; kidneys; blood; skin; eyes Inh; ing; con

Irrit eyes, nose; in animals: lac, dysp, pulm edema; tremor, narco; liver, kidney damage; anemia

METHYL DICHLOROSILANE     75-54-7

eyes; skin; resp tract; lungs

METHYL SILICATE     681-84-5

resp tract; eyes; lungs

kidneys; liver

Inhalation: burning sensation, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, symptoms may be delayed

Eyes: redness, pain, loss of vision

Eyes; resp sys; kidneys Inh; ing; con (vapliq)

Irrit eyes, corn damage (following even short term exposure to vapor); lung, kidney inj; pulm edema

METHYL TRICHLOROSILANE     75-79-6

eyes; skin; resp tract; lungs

Inhalation: corrosive, burning sensation, cough, shortness of breath, unconsciousness, symptoms may be delayed

Skin: corrosive, redness, skin burns, pain, blisters

Eyes: corrosive, redness, pain, loss of vision, severe deep burns

POLYDIMETHYLSILOXANE     9016-00-6

eyes

Eyes: redness, pain

SILANE, DICHLORO-     4109-96-0

eyes; skin; resp tract; lungs

lungs

Inhalation: burning sensation, cough, laboured breathing, shortness of breath, sore throat

Skin: redness, skin burns, burning sensation, pain, blisters

Eyes: redness, pain, loss of vision

SILICON TETRAHYDRIDE     7803-62-5

eyes; resp tract; lungs

lungs

Inhalation: burning sensation, cough, laboured breathing, shortness of breath, sore throat, symptoms may be delayed

Eyes: redness, pain

Ingestion: weakness

Eyes; skin; resp sys; CNS Inh

Irrit eyes, skin, muc memb; nau, head

SILICIC ACID, DISODIUM SALT     6834-92-0

eyes; skin; resp tract; lungs

skin

Inhalation: burning sensation, cough, shortness of breath

Skin: redness, serious skin burns, pain, blisters

Eyes: redness, pain, blurred vision, severe deep burns

Ingestion: burning sensation, diarrhoea, shock or collapse, vomiting, collapse

SILICON TETRAFLUORIDE     7783-61-1

eyes; skin; resp tract; lungs

Inhalation: burning sensation, cough, laboured breathing, shortness of breath, sore throat

Skin: redness, skin burns, pain, blisters

Eyes: redness, pain, loss of vision, severe deep burns

TETRACHLOROSILANE     10026-04-7

eyes; lungs

Inhalation: burning sensation, cough, laboured breathing, shortness of breath, sore throat

Skin: redness, skin burns, pain, blisters

Eyes: redness, pain, loss of vision, severe deep burns

TRICHLOROSILANE     10025-78-2

eyes; skin; resp tract; lungs

lungs

Inhalation: burning sensation of the chest, cough, laboured breathing, shortness of breath, sore throat

Skin: redness, skin burns, burning sensation, pain, blisters

Eyes: redness, pain, loss of vision

TRIMETHYLHLOROSILANE     75-77-4

eyes; skin; resp tract; lungs

skin

Ingestion: Inhalation: burning sensation, cough, laboured breathing

Skin: redness, pain, blisters

Eyes: redness, pain, severe deep burnsabdominal pain, burning sensation, weakness

 

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Chemical Formula

Chemical

Synonyms
UN Code

CAS-Number

1344952

CALCIUM SILICATE

Calcium hydrosilicate;
Calcium monosilicate;
Calcium polysilicate;
Calcium silicate;
Calflo E;
Calsil;
CS lafarge;
Florite R;
Marimet 45;
Microcal 160;
Promaxon P60;
Silene WF;
Silmos t;
Solex;
Stabinex NW 7PS;
Starlex l;
SW 400;
Toyofine A

1344-95-2

78104

ETHYL SILICATE

Ethyl orthosilicate;
Ethyl silicate;
Extrema;
Silane, tetraethoxy-;
TEOS;
Tetraethoxysilane;
Tetraethyl orthosilicate;
Tetraethyl silicate
UN1292

78-10-4

75547

METHYL DICHLOROSILANE

Dichloromethylsilane
UN1242

75-54-7

681845

METHYL SILICATE

Methyl orthosilicate;
Methyl silicate;
Silicic acid, methyl ester of ortho-;
Silicic acid, tetramethyl ester;
Tetramethoxysilane;
Tetramethyl silicate
UN2606

681-84-5

75796

METHYL TRICHLOROSILANE

Methylsilicochloroform;
Methylsilyl trichloride;
Trichloromethylsilane
UN1250

75-79-6

9016006

POLYDIMETHYLSILOXANE

Af 72;
Af 75;
Dimethicone 350;
Dow Corning 346;
Geon;
Good-rite;
Gum;
Hycar;
Latex;
Methyl silicone;
Polymethylsiloxane

9016-00-6

4109960

SILANE, DICHLORO-

4109-96-0

6834920

SILICIC ACID, DISODIUM SALT

B-W;
Crystamet;
Disodium metasilicate;
Disodium monosilicate;
Metso 20;
Metso beads, drymet;
Silicic acid, disodium salt ;
Sodium silicate;
Water glass

6834-92-0

Si

SILICON

7440-21-3

SiC

SILICON CARBIDE

Annanox CK;
Betarundum;
Ultrafine;
Carbofrax M;
Carbolon;
Carbon silicide;
Crystar;
Crystolon 37;
Crystolon 39;
Densic c 500

409-21-2

SiO

SILICON MONOXIDE

10477-28-6

7803625

SILICON TETRAHYDRIDE

Flots 100SCO;
Monosilane;
Silane;
Silicane
UN2203

7803-62-5

7783611

SILICON TETRAFLUORIDE

Perfluorosilane;
Silane, tetrafluoro-;
Tetrafluorosilane
UN1859

7783-61-1

10026047

TETRACHLOROSILANE

Extrema;
Silicon chloride;
Silicio(tetracloruro di);
Silicon tetrachloride
UN1818

10026-04-7

10025782

TRICHLOROSILANE

Silicochloroform;
Trichloromonosilane
UN1295

10025-78-2

75774

TRIMETHYL CHLOROSILANE

Chlorotrimethylsilane;
Silane, trimethylchloro-;
Silicane, chlorotrimethyl-;
Tl 1163;
Trimethylsilyl chloride
UN1298

75-77-4

 

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Chemical Name
CAS-Number

Colour/Form

Boiling Point (°C)

Melting Point (°C)

Molecular Weight

Solubility in Water

Relative Density (water=1)

Relative Vapour Density (air=1)

Vapour Pressure/ (Kpa)

Inflam.
Limits

Flash Point (°C)

Auto Ignition Point (°C)

n-BUTYLMERCAPTAN
109-79-5

colourless liquid

98.4

-115.7

90.2

sl sol

0.8337

3.1

4.0

2 cc

<225

tert-BUTYLMERCAPTAN
75-66-1

mobile liquid; colourless liquid

64

-0.5

90.2

insol

0.8002

3.1

19.0

-26 cc

CETYLMERCAPTAN
2917-26-2

liquid or solid

184

18

insol

0.84

8.9

10 Pa

135

CYCLOHEXYLMER­CAPTAN
1569-69-3

liquid

158

-118

116.2

insol

0.9782

4.00

1.3

43 cc

DECYLMERCAPTAN
143-10-2

colourless liquid

241

-26

174.3

insol

0.84

6.0

<10 Pa

DODECYLMERCAPTAN
112-55-0

water-white to pale yellow liquid; oily colourless liquid

@ 15 mm Hg

-7

202.4

insol

0.8450

7.0

@ 25 °C

1278 oc

230

ETHYLMERCAPTAN
75-08-1

colourless liquid

35

-144.4

62.13

sl sol

0.83907

2.14

589

2.8 ll
18.0 ul

-483

299

n-HEPTYLMERCAPTAN
1639-09-4

177

-43

132.26

insol

0.8427

n-HEXYLMERCAPTAN
111-31-9

151

-81

118.23

insol

0.8424

2-MERCAPTOETHANOL
60-24-2

water-white mobile liquid

@ 742 mm Hg

78.13

sol

1.1143

2.7

1.00 mm Hg

METHYLMERCAPTAN
74-93-1

water-white liquid when below boiling point, or colourless gas

5.9

-123

48.1

sl sol

0.8665

1.66

@ 26.1 °C

3.9 ll
21.8 ul

-18

METHANESULFONYL CHLORIDE
124-63-0

pale yellow liquid

@ 18 mm Hg

-32

114.55

insol

1.4573

OCTADECANETHIOL
2885-00-9

solid

205-209

25

0.8420

n-OCTANETHIOL
111-88-6

water-white liquid

199.1

-49.2

146.30

0.8433

46

1-PENTANETHIOL
110-66-7

liquid

@ 460 mm Hg

-75.7

104.21

insol

0.8421

3.59

@25 °C

18 oc

PERCHLOROME­THYLMERCAPTAN
594-42-3

oily, yellow liquid; yellow to orange-red

147.5

185.88

insol

1.6947

6.414

3 mm Hg

PHENYLMERCAPTAN
108-98-5

water-white liquid; prism-like crystals from petroleum ether

168

-14.8

110.17

insol

1.0766

3.8

@ 18 °C

<55

PROPANETHIOL
107-03-9

colourless, mobile liquid

67-68

-113.3

76.17

sl sol

0.8411 g/ml

@ 25 °C

-20

SODIUM DODECYLBENZENE­SULFONATE
25155-30-0

white to light yellow flakes, granules, or powder

>300

sol

1.0 for 60% slurry

THIOACETAMIDE
62-55-5

crystals from benzene; colourless leaflets; crystals from alc, plates from ether

116

75.1

v sol

THIOACETIC ACID
507-09-5

yellow liquid

93

<-17

76.1

sl sol

1.064

2.62

18-21

2,2'-THIODIETHANOL
111-48-8

164-166

-10

122.2

1.1819

THIOGLYCOLIC ACID
68-11-1

colourless liquid

@ 20 mm Hg

-16.5

92.1

misc

1.3253

@ 18 °C

 

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Chemical Name
CAS-Number

Physical

Chemical

UN Class or Division /  Subsidiary Risks

ANTU
86-88-4

The substance decomposes on heating producing toxic fumes including nitrogen oxides and sulphur oxides • Reacts with strong oxidants causing fire and explosion hazard

6.1

BENZENESULPHONYL CHLORIDE
98-09-9

8

n-BUTYLMERCAPTAN
109-79-5

The vapour is heavier than air and may travel along the ground; distant ignition possible

The substance decomposes on burning or heating, producing highly toxic fumes (sulphur dioxide) • Reacts with acids, bases, alkali metals, and strong oxidants

3

tert-BUTYLMERCAPTAN
75-66-1

The vapour is heavier than air and may travel along the ground; distant ignition possible

The substance decomposes on burning producing highly toxic gases including sulphur oxides • Reacts with strong acids, strong bases, alkali metals, strong reducing agents, strong oxidants

CETYLMERCAPTAN
2917-26-2

The substance decomposes on burning producing highly toxic gases including sulphur oxides • Reacts violently with strong oxidants, acids, reducing agents, alkali metals

CYCLOHEXYLMERCAPTAN
1569-69-3

The substance decomposes on burning producing highly toxic gases including sulphur dioxide • Reacts with strong oxidants, reducing agents, and alkali metals

3

DECYLMERCAPTAN
143-10-2

The substance decomposes on burning producing highly toxic gases including sulphur dioxide • Reacts with strong oxidants and strong bases

DIETHYLSULPHATE
64-67-5

The substance decomposes on heating producing flammable and toxic fumes • The substance is a strong oxidant and reacts with combustible and reducing materials • The substance is a strong reducing agent and reacts with oxidants • The solution in water is a strong acid, it reacts violently with bases and is corrosive

6.1

DIETHYLSULPHIDE
352-93-2

3

DIMETHYLSULPHATE
77-78-1

6.1/ 8

DIMETHYLSULPHIDE
75-18-3

The vapour is heavier than air and may travel along the ground; distant ignition possible

The substance decomposes on heating and on burning producing toxic and corrosive fumes (hydrogen sulphide and sulphur oxides) • Reacts violently with strong oxidants causing fire and explosion hazard

3

DIMETHYLSULPHOXIDE
67-68-5

The vapour is heavier than air and may travel along the ground; distant ignition possible

The substance decomposes on heating above 150 °C or on burning producing toxic fumes • Reacts violently with strong oxidants such as perchlorates

DODECYLMERCAPTAN
112-55-0

The substance decomposes on burning producing highly toxic gases including sulphur dioxide • Reacts violently with strong oxidants and alkali metals

ETHYLMERCAPTAN
75-08-1

The vapour is heavier than air and may travel along the ground; distant ignition possible

On combustion, forms carbon monoxide, sulphur oxides and hydrogen sulphide • The substance is a weak acid • Reacts with oxidants causing fire and explosion hazard • Reacts vigourously with strong acids and bases causing toxic hazard

3

LAURYL SODIUM SULPHATE
151-21-3

On combustion, forms toxic gases • Gives off toxic fumes in a fire

MERCAPTOACETIC ACID
68-11-1

8

2-MERCAPTOETHANOL
60-24-2

8

METHANESULPHONYL CHLORIDE
124-63-0

6.1/ 8

D,L-METHIONINE
59-51-8

The substance decomposes on heating producing sulphur oxides, nitrous oxides • Reacts with strong oxidants

METHYLMERCAPTAN
74-93-1

The gas is heavier than air and may travel along the ground; distant ignition possible

The substance decomposes on heating and on burning producing toxic sulphur oxides • Reacts violently with strong oxidants • Reacts with acids to form flammable and toxic gas (hydrogen sulphide)

2.3/ 2.1

1-PENTANETHIOL
110-66-7

3

PERCHLOROMETHYLMERCAPTAN
594-42-3

6.1

PHENYLMERCAPTAN
108-98-5

The substance decomposes on heating producing toxic fumes (sulphur oxides and carbon monoxide) • Reacts with acids to form toxic fumes (sulphur oxides)

6.1/ 3

PROPANETHIOL
107-03-9

3

SODIUM DODECYLBENZENESULPHONATE
25155-30-0

The substance decomposes on heating and on burning producing toxic and irritating fumes (sulphur oxides) • Reacts with acids or acid fumes producing toxic and irritating fumes (sulphur oxides)

SODIUM THIOCYANATE
540-72-7

The substance decomposes on heating and under influence of light producing toxic fumes of sulphur oxides, nitrogen oxides and cyanides • Reacts violently with acids, strong bases and strong oxidants

THIOACETAMIDE
62-55-5

The substance decomposes on burning producing toxic fumes

THIOACETIC ACID
507-09-5

The vapour is heavier than air and may travel along the ground; distant ignition possible

The substance decomposes on burning producing toxic and corrosive fumes (sulphur oxides) • The substance is a medium strong acid and is corrosive • Reacts violently with strong oxidants causing fire and explosion hazard • Reacts slowly with water forming acetic acid and hydrogen sulfide

THIOUREA
62-56-6

The substance decomposes on heating producing toxic fumes of nitrogen oxides and sulphur oxides • acts with sufphydryl-oxidizing agents and forms complexes and adducts with metallic salts and many organic compounds including proteins and certain hydrocarbons • Reacts violently with acrolein, strong acids and strong oxidants

THIRAM
137-26-8

Dust explosion possible if in powder or granular form, mixed with air

The substance decomposes on heating and on burning producing toxic fumes (nitrogen, sulphur oxides) • Reacts with strong oxidants, acids and oxidizable materials

6.1

For UN Class: 1.5 = very insensitive substances which have a mass explosion hazard; 2.1 = flammable gas; 2.3 = toxic gas; 3 = flammable liquid; 4.1 = flammable solid; 4.2 = substance liable to spontaneous combustion; 4.3 = substance which in contact with water emits flammable gases; 5.1 = oxidizing substance; 6.1 = toxic; 7 = radioactive; 8 = corrosive substance

 

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Page 5 of 122

" DISCLAIMER: The ILO does not take responsibility for content presented on this web portal that is presented in any language other than English, which is the language used for the initial production and peer-review of original content. Certain statistics have not been updated since the production of the 4th edition of the Encyclopaedia (1998)."

Contents

Preface
Part I. The Body
Part II. Health Care
Part III. Management & Policy
Part IV. Tools and Approaches
Part V. Psychosocial and Organizational Factors
Part VI. General Hazards
Part VII. The Environment
Part VIII. Accidents and Safety Management
Part IX. Chemicals
Part X. Industries Based on Biological Resources
Part XI. Industries Based on Natural Resources
Part XII. Chemical Industries
Part XIII. Manufacturing Industries
Part XIV. Textile and Apparel Industries
Part XV. Transport Industries
Part XVI. Construction
Part XVII. Services and Trade
Education and Training Services
Emergency and Security Services
Entertainment and the Arts
Arts and Crafts
Performing and Media Arts
Entertainment
Entertainment and the Arts Resources
Health Care Facilities and Services
Hotels and Restaurants
Office and Retail Trades
Personal and Community Services
Public and Government Services
Transport Industry and Warehousing
Part XVIII. Guides

Entertainment and the Arts References

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